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How do you Solve a Problem like Ched Evans?


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#1 jackdiddley

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Posted 17 November 2014 - 10:25 AM

You probably haven't heard of Ched Evans. If you have, you probably hadn't until a couple of years ago.

Evans was a striker for League One (two divisions below the Premier League) football team Sheffield United. That was until he raped a 19 year old woman.

The woman was having consensual sex with one of Evans' friends, who sent him a text inviting him to join. By the time Evans arrived, the woman was heavily intoxicated and admitted in court that she couldn't remember what had happened. The jury convicted Evans of rape on the basis that the woman was too drunk to consent - they acquitted his friend. Evans vehemently denies raping the woman, and although he has been refused appeal twice, is still working to clear his name.

Evans spent 2 and a half years of his 5 year sentence in prison and has now been released on license - the usual procedure for such cases. At the request of the PFA (Professional Footballers Association), Evans has returned to training with Sheffield United, but is not under contract. This has sparked a storm on social media between his supporters and those against him.

One female member of the Board of Trustees has resigned. Jessica Ennis-Hill, Olympic gold medalist and Sheffield United fan, has said she will ask for her name to be removed from one of the stands at United's ground if he is given a contract.

The supporters come in two forms. There are those that believe Evans to be innocent - they believe his version of events, despite the court verdict, and those that accept he is guilty but believe he should be allowed to return to his previous employment, if they will have him. His detractors, naturally, take the view that an unremorseful rapist should not be a highly-paid, role model footballer.

There are certain jobs Evans could not take due to his crime - he could never be a teacher or policeman for example. Footballer is not one of those professions. There is no legal reason why Evans can not go back to his previous job.

One argument is that he has served his time and so should be able to re-enter society and be rehabilitated, and that returning to work is part of that. The counter argument is that he is being allowed to carry on as if nothing has happened, while his victim is in no such position.

Where do you stand? Should he be allowed to return? Does it send out the message that if you commit a serious offence you can go back to your previous life, regardless of how privaledged it was? Should he not be allowed to return to football at all?

For what it is worth, if I were a Sheffield United fan, I would be deeply troubled if he was re-signed. I'd even be worried by his training with the team. Should his appeal prove successful, that would change things, but Inwould not want my team associating with a rapist.

#2 aus

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Posted 17 November 2014 - 06:40 PM

sportsmen are role models, So a higher standard of morality is expected. This may be wrong when they are innocent but it is the way it is at least in Australia.



#3 minesadorada

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Posted 18 November 2014 - 01:55 AM

Ched Evans has a website here: http://chedevans.com/  Worth reading for background info.

 

Whatever the facts of the incident, Sheffield United have been badly advised by the F.A. to take him back IMO.

 

Mud sticks.



#4 aus

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Posted 18 November 2014 - 06:37 PM

mud does stick. Our Football player was not charge with rape but indecent assault for which he was fined. But he is unemployed now with no prospect of a job. The media still is throwing mud wanting a tougher sentence.



#5 Aint

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Posted 19 November 2014 - 08:54 PM

Abstaining from drunken sex is not a requirement of his job.

He did the time for what he was convicted of. What does serving time mean if he can't get a job as a ball player afterwards?

#6 minesadorada

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Posted 20 November 2014 - 05:00 AM

If he was just an anonymous ball-player then there would be no problem.

 

F.A. club Soccer in the UK is also part of the entertainment industry, where stricter standards of moral behaviour apply.

 

I'm not agreeing that is right, but it is true.



#7 Aint

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Posted 20 November 2014 - 05:35 PM

Wait a minute. Did you just say "entertainment industry" and "stricter standards of moral behaviour"? It's not the superfluous u that's throwing me off.

#8 aus

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Posted 20 November 2014 - 07:25 PM

Whether sport is part of the entertainment industry it does get the same media attention. Because newspapers and magazines will report your evey action higher standars of morality are required. Whether this is fair is another matter.



#9 jackdiddley

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Posted 21 November 2014 - 03:32 AM

UPDATE: Sheffield United have retracted their offer to allow Evans to train with them, citing the unforeseen level of feeling expressed by the public.

#10 aus

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Posted 21 November 2014 - 07:07 PM

Jack It is hard to compare cases of footballers in different countries. I know little about Evans. But I believed like our footballer Steven Mile he was charges with sexual offences. He was found guilty but that many people think the sentence imposed was too low. So both have been ban from training with their team. Many think they should not be coaches or on media as commentators. So they have no hope of getting employment in their field.

 Should this extra punishment be impose because thy are famous but not imposed on lesser men in lesser jobs who can still find employment in their field.



#11 jackdiddley

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Posted 22 November 2014 - 04:31 AM

Firstly, I'm not sure there is such thing as a lesser man than a rapist or sexual offender.

 

Ched Evans has not been officially banned, but it has already proved to be a PR nightmare for one club to allow him to simply train, never  mind play. I can't see any other clubs taking a chance on him.

 

From a legal perspective, it probably isn't fair that these men are refused a return to their chosen profession. After all, a criminal record is not a legal bar from being a sportsman. But it's not just a legal perspective. This is a guy that will be cheered week in and week out for his exploits on the field. Personally, I don't want to be cheering for a rapist.

 

In America, we have Ray Rice (knocked his then fiancee out cold in an elevator) and Adrian Peterson (beat his 4 year old son bloody with a switch) currently serving suspensions in the NFL. People on Seattle Seahawks forums have been asking if Peterson could be signed by the Seahawks. Personally, I hope not - I don't want someone who would do that to a small child playing for my team.

 

I think that if you are a professional sportsman, whether you like it or not, you are expected to behave in a certain way. If you have shown yourself unable to uphold the expected standards, I don't think you should be allowed to be a professional sportsman.



#12 Cy_Click

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Posted 25 November 2014 - 05:21 PM

...................

For what it is worth, if I were a Sheffield United fan, I would be deeply troubled if he was re-signed. I'd even be worried by his training with the team. Should his appeal prove successful, that would change things, but Inwould not want my team associating with a rapist.

 

If his appeal was successful what would change? Would he simply not be a convicted rapist?



#13 Aint

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Posted 25 November 2014 - 10:50 PM

What jobs should convicted sex offenders be allowed to have?

#14 jackdiddley

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Posted 26 November 2014 - 09:04 AM

Cy_Click, I'm not sure I understand your question.

If his appeal is successful, he's not a "not convicted rapist", he is simply not a rapist. As things stand, he is guilty of rape and therefore he is a rapist. If his appeal is successful and that conviction is quashed, he is not a rapist.

You can't be innocent of rape AND a rapist at the same time. They are mutually exclusive.

#15 jackdiddley

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Posted 26 November 2014 - 09:05 AM

What jobs shod a sex offender by allowed? I would say one in which they are not adored by thousands/millions of fans on a daily basis.



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